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SPRING UPDATE & TRAIL CLOSURE - MAY 12, 2017

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Warm temperatures over the past two weeks have had an impact on snow conditions in the Teton Range.  Evidence of point slope releases and "roller balls" is abundant on the high peaks.  Freezing overnight temperatures have been hit or miss, resulting in poor and unsafe travel conditions at times.  Trails in the valley are beginning to melt out, but travel is still cumbersome and difficult due to lingering snow drifts.  The Inspiration Point area is no exception and hikers should be prepared to deal with significant snow travel that is difficult and potentially hazardous at this time.  Hikers should also be aware of several area trail closures, including Hidden Falls, due to ongoing construction work (see above map).
   

SNOW AND COLD CONTINUE - APRIL 27, 2017

Park Headquarters received almost a foot of new snow overnight last night!  April has been a very wet and cold month in the Tetons, leaving near-record snow depths intact in the mountains above 9,000 feet.  The mountains above 9,000 feet have received up to 50 inches (3.5-4" SWE) of new snow with winds gusting up to 50 mph in the past 72 hours!  

Additional precipitation and/or warming temperatures have the potential to create dangerous avalanche conditions during the upcoming months of May and June.  Backcountry users should remain extremely cautious with route selection and timing in the high country while negotiating this transitional snow pack.  The Bridger Teton Avalanche Center is no longer issuing avalanche forecasts for this winter season, however, their website still provides access to relevant weather station data.    

Park snowplows back in action this morning! - 4.27.17   

HIGH COUNTRY STILL BURIED UNDER DEEP SNOW - APRIL 11, 2017

April has been relatively cool and snowy so far, continuing to add to already near-record snow depths above 9,000 feet.  Settled snow depths at this elevation range from 7-12 feet and settled cold/dry snow is prevalent at and above these altitudes.  Localized wind slabs continue to be an issue at these higher locations throughout the Teton Range (Recent Rescue Report).  On top of all that, backcountry users must continue to be aware of wet avalanche hazard, especially during periods of warming afternoon temperatures.  Evidence abounds of wet snow releases on slopes at all elevations and aspects.  

The coming spring is more readily apparent at the lower elevations as creeks are beginning to open up and bare ground is starting to show.  Be extremely cautious of lake crossings as we move into late April and May as they may no longer be a safe option for cross country travel.

As a reminder all overnight backcountry camping requires a permit that can be obtained at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center in Moose between 9am and 5pm.  Food Storage utilizing bear canisters is required in Grand Teton National Park for all overnight stays in the backcountry. 

    East Face of Teewinot - 4.1.17

RECORD SNOWFALL AND EARLY BEAR SIGN - MARCH 13, 2017

We have received over 536” of snow for the season. This means that there will be a fairly high likelihood of snow remaining on mountain passes and in the high peaks deep into the summer months. If you are planning a backcountry trip this summer it will probably be prudent to bring an ice axe and the knowledge of how to use it.

Last week bear tracks were seen, and confirmed, in the high country of Yellowstone National Park. As we are beginning to move into spring be diligent with proper food storage and think seriously about bringing bear spray with you if you venture into the backcountry. Mandatory food storage requirements are in place and will be strictly enforced.
Valley lakes are experiencing surface flooding, use caution and prepare for alternate trips.