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Content Contributions made by the Jenny Lake Rangers

HAPPY NEW YEAR! - JANUARY 4, 2020

Teton Range - 1/4/2020
Winter is in full swing in the Tetons with ample snow coverage at all elevations!  For up to date information on avalanche conditions in the range please visit the Bridger Teton Avalanche Center website for detailed information.  An exciting new feature of the website this year are weekly GTNP specific snow pack discussions by our very own snow ranger Lisa Van Sciver!  Be sure to take a look at these discussions before heading out into the Park's backcountry by clicking here.  
    

UPDATE OCTOBER 23, 2019

Over the previous few days snow has fallen on the Tetons above 8000 ft.  With the fresh coat of snow and cold temperatures, early winter conditions will remain and probably carry into the actual beginning of winter.  All alpine areas will have some snow, ice, and verglas.

SNOW AND ICE IN THE MOUNTAINS-SEPTEMBER 21, 2019

East Face of Mt Teewinot from Lupine Meadows. Snow line at 8,000 feet. 9.21.2019

The first of several storm systems impacted the Tetons during the first week of September.  Since then, significant snow fall has continued above 10,000 feet. Expect to find much more challenging winter conditions on the Grand and other high peaks. If hiking or backpacking in the mountains it's that time of year to be prepared for much wetter and colder conditions.
The days are getting shorter and the temperatures are falling. Be sure to pack plenty of extra layers and a headlamp.

The following link is a good write up on September weather events:
https://www.mountainweather.com/2019/09/summer-snowstorms/

CHANGING SEASONS - SEPTEMBER 6, 2019

Clouds over the East Face of Teewinot on 9.6.2019

After a sunny, dry Labor Day weekend in the Tetons, the weather is subtly changing at higher elevations with the potential for rain and snow in the forecast during this upcoming week. As temperatures dip at night, look for recent precipitation to form icy conditions on previously dry routes throughout the mountains, specifically on popular climbs on the Grand Teton such as the Owen-Spalding route and other shadier aspects of the high peaks. Fall is on its way.