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SNOW AND ICE IN THE MOUNTAINS-SEPTEMBER 21, 2019

East Face of Mt Teewinot from Lupine Meadows. Snow line at 8,000 feet. 9.21.2019

The first of several storm systems impacted the Tetons during the first week of September.  Since then, significant snow fall has continued above 10,000 feet. Expect to find much more challenging winter conditions on the Grand and other high peaks. If hiking or backpacking in the mountains it's that time of year to be prepared for much wetter and colder conditions.
The days are getting shorter and the temperatures are falling. Be sure to pack plenty of extra layers and a headlamp.

The following link is a good write up on September weather events:
https://www.mountainweather.com/2019/09/summer-snowstorms/

CHANGING SEASONS - SEPTEMBER 6, 2019

Clouds over the East Face of Teewinot on 9.6.2019

After a sunny, dry Labor Day weekend in the Tetons, the weather is subtly changing at higher elevations with the potential for rain and snow in the forecast during this upcoming week. As temperatures dip at night, look for recent precipitation to form icy conditions on previously dry routes throughout the mountains, specifically on popular climbs on the Grand Teton such as the Owen-Spalding route and other shadier aspects of the high peaks. Fall is on its way.

JENNY LAKE RANGER STATION CLOSED FOR THE SEASON - SEPTEMBER 3, 2019

The Jenny Lake Ranger Station is closed for the 2019 season.  The visitor centers in Moose and Colter Bay remain open and park information and backcountry camping permits can be obtained there during business hours.  Backcountry camping permits and bear canisters are required for all overnight trips into Grand Teton National Park.  

CONDITIONS UPDATE - AUGUST 23, 2019

Looking toward Teewinot and the East Prong from the Cathedral Traverse on 8.22.19

Although the weather in the Tetons this past week has been sunny and dry, a short stint of snow flurries on the summit of the Grand yesterday served as a reminder that changing conditions are on their way. Currently, much of the snow along the Grand Traverse has melted away, and north-facing objectives are drying out. Until new storms arrive, climbers are going to the summit of the Grand without an ice axe or crampons, however, an ice axe is still warranted for the approach to the SW Couloir of the Middle Teton. Be mindful of any recent storms and low temperatures, which can create icy conditions. Get an early start, and be prepared for increasingly colder temperatures during the evening and overnight.